Look again at that dot.

Look again at that dot.

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us.

On it, everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.

The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines.

Every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

– Carl Sagan, 1934-1996

 

Photo Credit: NASA (Public Domain). The Earth as imaged by Voyager 1 as it exited the solar system in 1990, dubbed ‘Pale Blue Dot’.

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Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be.

And whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul.
With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.

Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.

 

– from Max Erhmann’s “Desiderata,” The Poems of Max Erhmann, p. 165 (1948)

Title Art

Liebster Award Question #1 and #2: How did you decide on the title of your blog? What is one word that sums up the heart of your blog and why?

(Yup, I’m mashing up the questions. Because I can. Take that society.)

I had been thinking about starting a blog for a while; someplace I could share the stories of things I’ve seen and done as a fan trying to live the dream. (I haven’t written them yet, but believe me, I’ve got stories.) 😉

I didn’t want to do film news and reviews – there are thousands of sites already dedicated to those things, and that seemed to narrow the scope of possible subjects too much for me. I wanted the blog to be both a reflection and a conversation about what my friends and I talk about – pop culture; The Biz; film theory and history; and the latest things that have inspired us. I wanted it to be a celebration of fandom that was positive, inclusive, and passionate. The closest I could come to capturing that idea was by making it “true”.

I wrote more extensively about this process in my About Page — Who?.

Three chords and a TED Talk

Three chords and a TED Talk

This fan writes songs about talks that move him. Inspiration from inspiration from inspiration.

#truefandom

TED Blog

Singer and songwriter Nigel Gordon writes songs on his guitar inspired by TED Talks. Singer and songwriter Nigel Gordon writes songs on his guitar inspired by TED Talks.

Many people feel a burst of inspiration after watching a TED Talk. Some take action by volunteering their time or making a donation. Nigel Gordon, on the other hand, has an individual reaction: He writes songs about TED Talks he loves.

A singer and songwriter, as well as an entrepreneur, Gordon got his introduction to TED when a friend sent him Sir Ken Robinson’s “How schools kill creativity.” “I’ve been a TED addict ever since,” he says.

In 2012, Gordon heard Sugata Mitra’s talk “The child-driven education,” which tells the story of what happened when Mitra embedded a computer in a wall in a slum in India, and came back to discover that kids had used it to teach themselves a wide range of subjects. (Mitra would go on to win…

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